Monday, March 21, 2016

APPLE, IKEA, MICHAELS, And More Recalls

Today Apple gets some mention in the recall zone because of a wall adapter, while IKEA once again hits the CPSC news with some ceiling lamp recalls.

Other recalls involve children's booties that choke, and high chairs that can tumble.

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Apple Recalls Travel Adapter Kits and Plugs Due to Risk of Electric Shock

The two-prong wall plug adapters for Australia/New Zealand/Argentina, Brazil, Continental Europe and Korea can break and expose the metal portion of the adapter, posing an electric shock risk.

Contact: Apple at 800-275-2273 any time, or online at www.apple.com and click on AC Wall Plug Adapter Recall Program for more information.

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BYA Sports Recalls Skyline Backyard Zipline Kits Due to Fall Hazard

A crimp in the zipline can fail allowing the cable to pull free or become slack while in use, posing a fall hazard to the user.

Contact: BYA Sports collect at 303-443-0163 from 8 a .m. to 5 p.m. MT Monday through Friday, or online at www.BYAsports.com and click on the Recall Information tab for more information.

(Sold at: REI and other sporting goods stores nationwide and online at promotive.com from August 2013 through July 2015 )

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Classic Characters Recalls Infant Booties Due to Choking Hazard; Sold Exclusively at Cracker Barrel Old Country Store

The pompoms at the tip of the toe can detach, posing a choking hazard to young children.

Contact:  Classic Characters, Inc. toll-free at 866-274-3452 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or online at www.classiccharacters.com and click on “safety notice” for more information.

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Crescent Point Energy Recalls To Inspect Propane Gas Due to Fire and Burn Hazard

The recalled propane does not have sufficient levels of odorant to help alert consumers of a gas leak.  Failure to detect leaking gas can present fire, explosion and thermal burn hazards.

Contact: Crescent Point Energy toll free at 866-421-4266 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. MT, email info@youandpropane.com or online at www.youandpropane.com for more information.

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IKEA Recalls Ceiling Lamps Due to Laceration Hazard

The plastic retaining clips that secure the glass shades to the lamp housings can break and allow the glass shades to fall, posing a laceration hazard.

Contact: IKEA toll-free at 888-966-4532 anytime or online at www.ikea-usa.com and click on Press Room at the bottom of the page then Product Recalls for more information.

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Michaels Recalls Artificial Poinsettias Due to Risk of Mold Exposure

Mold can be present on the stems and bushes, posing a risk of respiratory or other infections in consumers with compromised immune systems, damaged lungs or an allergy to mold.

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Michaels Recalls Holiday Paper Boxes Due to Risk of Mold Exposure

Mold can be present on the boxes, posing a risk of respiratory or other infections in consumers with compromised immune systems, damaged lungs or an allergy to mold.

Contact:  Michaels at 800-642-4235 from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or online at www.michaels.com and click on “Product Recalls” for more information.

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Nuna Baby Essentials Recalls High Chairs Due to Fall Hazard

The arm bar can bend or detach during use, posing a fall hazard to children.

Contact: Nuna Baby Essentials toll-free at 855-686-2872 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.nuna.eu/usa/ and click on “Product Recall” under the “Support” section on the sidebar of the homepage for more information.

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{CPSC}

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Thursday, March 17, 2016

Product Recalls: Shower Rugs, Baby Seats, Strollers, Toy Trucks, Power Cords and More

Here's another edition of Bruce's Consumer Bits where I find the products with the most distribution and try to send you a heads up about them, just in case these dangerous products are in your homes. Especially the recalls involving infants, kids and toys are the scary ones I'd like to pass around the most.

As always, you can contact the distributors or check out the CPSC website for more recall.s

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AquaRug shower rugs

The four suction cups on the underside of the rugs can fail to prevent slipping, posing a fall hazard to the user.

Contact: Tristar Products toll-free at 888-770-7125 from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or visit the firm’s website at www.tristarproductsinc.com and click on “Aqua Rug Recall” for more information.

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Britax B-Safe 35 and B-Safe 35 Elite infant car seats and travel systems

The car seat carry handle can crack and break allowing the seat to fall unexpectedly, posing a risk of injury to the infant.

Contact: Britax at 800-683-2045 from 8:30 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. ET Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. ET on Friday, or by email at Britax.Recall@britax.com. Consumers can also visit the firm’s website at www.us.Britax.com and click on “Safety Notice” at the top right of the page.

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Britax B-Ready strollers

The foam padding on the stroller’s arm bar can come off in fragments if the child bites the arm bar, posing a choking hazard.

Contact: Britax at 800-683-2045 from 8:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. ET Monday through Thursday and from 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. ET on Friday, by email at Britax.Recall@britax.com or online at www.us.britax.com and click on Safety Notice at the top right, or                   www.B-ReadyRecall.com for more information.

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Thursday, March 3, 2016

SPAM Alerts

Hey, if you're sort of new to the web here are a few tips to keep in mind:

Don't answer unsolicited emails. They're info farming.

Don't freak out about internet warnings. Go check out SNOPES.com to verify internet warnings before spreading the news.

Don't answer weird emails from your friends. They may have become infected with a spam bot and are spamming their entire address book. Call them or send them a separate email to confirm the first weird one.

Don't buy into the cheap stuff, the offers for money for you to exchange for strangers, the letters saying you had a long lost relative die, etc., etc..

And don't fall for those stupid as Facebook stunts that say resharing this will get some rich dude to share his money with you. Rich dudes do not share. They earned it and believe everyone needs to earn their keep.

If you're tempted to open a link, just delete the email. Or hover your mouse over the link to see that even though the link text might say "bob's best juicing machines," hovering your mouse over the link will show you the real link, like "server.catch.email_address.net/stupid/people/c.ick/here."

Also, if "your bank" or other financially operated institution fires you off an email asking for your password or to follow a link to sign in, DON'T.  Go open a browser, manually go to your bank or whatever site the email says it's from, and then log in. If you have a message, it should be noted once you sign in with your legitimate website in the messages section.

Just saying.

So what sparked this? A few cute spam emails I had in my inbox today.


Background Investigation Sites Sell Your Email Addresses

The other day I talked about how after I tried a test run on an online background investigation website, I started getting spam to an ordinarily quiet email account.

brusimm.com: background investigation sites warning

Quiet meaning I only saw about 10 spam emails a month.

So I used my test email account, signed up for trying this BI site. It took a long time in an interactive session, making a show of how much data it was digging up on me, and from some of the questions it asked during the process, it seemed reasonable, like it truly was digging up info on me.

But after the "test," is when things got interesting.

Because as far as I can tell, they sell your email addresses to spammers.

Why do I say that?

Remember that quiet email address I mentioned above? After I signed up, I started averaging over 30 spam emails a day. And since Feb 2nd, just shy of one month, I now have 423 junk emails in my Gmail spam folder.

They are mostly all "hook up" spams, but hey, I'm glad I used a test email account designed for bullshit like this, or I'd be honestly pissed and I'd be doing more than just writing about it.

Any way, thought you should know.

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