Monday, February 24, 2014

Mexicana, Amigo Cheese Recall

There's been a recall by a Delaware cheese company due to some illnesses and a death associated with their cheese product.

The cheeses come from Roos Foods of Kenton, Del., and they're recalling 16 different cheeses.

The different cheeses are under the Mexicana, Amigo, Santa Rosa De Lima and Anita brands.

Be alert gang!

{cbs news}
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Thursday, February 13, 2014

Product Recalls: Car Seats, Pet Food, GM, Toyota

Today's list of recalls have already been in the news over the last few days, but in case you missed these IMPORTANT issues, there recalls involve Graco child seats, GM cars where a few fatalities were associated with the problem, some dry pet food with Salmonella and another Toyota Prius recall.

Baby Seat Recall


GRACO is recalling almost FOUR MILLION child car seats.

The recall issue is that some buckles are not coming unlatched, and the small child could become trapped in the seat.

There's a controversy that says that some infant car seats, with the same buckles, should be included in this recall.

But if requested, parents of rear-facing infant seats can request new buckles for their seats.

There's no huge health hazard, except for the issue of some parents having to resort to cutting their kids out of the seats.

See the link for seats involved in the recall:  {.nbcbayarea.}

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GM Recalls Older Cars


GM is recalling their Chevy Cobalts (2005 through 07 models) and 2007+ Pontiac G5s.


When Spammers Say They're Not Spammers


When Spammers Say They're Not Spammers
The SEO spammers that used to hit up webmasters now have a new approach, and now they title their email "Ethical Internet Marketing."

Whew!  Thank god it's ethical!

So 'Lalit Verma,' from awesomewebsidecrawler said she'd like to have my attention for "Internet marketing for ."

She claims that  "Your website needs immediate improvement for some major issues with your website."

Ah, good eenglysh there Lalit.

According to this expert, I have

"
-Low online presence for many competitive keyword phrases

-Unorganized social media accounts

-Not compatible with all mobile devices

-Many bad back links to your website

"

Man, she's "good!"  She then goes on to 'splain to me that,

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

A Curious Tidbit About Facebook Hashtags

A Curious Tidbit About Facebook Hashtags
I noticed something odd and deceitful about Facebook's new hashtag system.  Yes, they mega web entity has adopted Twitter's hashtag practices and it's somewhat useful.  But I found something curious about it.

Last week I put up a post that was trending pretty strongly in Facebook, according to analytic feedback they provide in your face.

And the moment I shared a piece of information with the trending hashtag, I was told that several thousand people saw my post.

Wow, THAT'S COOL!

But wait.  How'd I get thousands of fans in a single instant?  I barely have a few hundred!

It seems that their reporting process, when it involves hashtags, tends to be more of a global report than a local, this is your page, report.

So be aware and stay calm.  As exciting as the numbers look, that's not what's happening to your page post.

It's like "web traffic" numbers that are reported by Google Analytics versus what Google Blogger report.  Two totally different worlds where nothing matches up, even though it seems like it should.

But hey, who am I?  Just the small fry getting crushed by the Google machine!
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Saturday, February 8, 2014

How Stupid Can Stupid People Be?

For me, sometimes "stupid" can be people who swerve to the left to make a right turn, being a traffic hazard.  Other "awesome" moves include things like stopping in the middle of the road to drop off or pick up their kids.  All while forcing cars to come to a sudden halt.

Then there are the pedestrians who charge on out into traffic against the red light.  I see that quite often and I am always amazed every time I see this stupidity.  They do it, forcing cars with the green light to stop for them.

Idiocy for sure.  (Or seriously full of themselves.)

But despite these examples, I can't help but wonder if they are fully aware that it is illegal to take weapons on airliners.  Ever since 9-11-01, it became a prevalent aspect of air travel, that you cannot even bring tiny sharp objects on an aircraft, never mind something like a gun.

I mean, it's been a fairly decent premise to never bring guns on an aircraft, but especially after 9-11.

Yet after screening 638.7 million passengers in 2013, believe it or not, during the check-in process, the TSA discovered 1,813 guns.  But wait, as if that's a crazy number, can you believe that 81% of the guns were loaded?

Yes.  And this number was up 16% from the year before.

(The airport with the most confiscated guns was Atlanta, with 111.)

Amongst these discoveries were loaded guns strapped to legs and ankles, the lining of carry-ons and inside boots.

These numbers do not include the bazooka rounds, blasting caps or C4.

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Seriously, in this day and age, these fine folks make the wayward, suicidal pedestrian, and skill-challenged drivers seem less of an issue than first perceived, though no less annoying.

And to think, these fine gun-toting folks that are getting popped for being stupid at the airports, well, tread carefully, because you never know just how many folks are "packing" that aren't headed to the airport!

Check out the TSA blog post for even more crazy info!
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Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Want To See What You're Missing on Facebook?


In the past I've chatted about how when Facebook makes changes, your feed sorting goes out the window, in favor of what they want you to see.  They've recently made a change (Tu, 2-4-14) and sure enough, my feed is back to "Top Stories" instead of "Most Recent."  I wish they'd take the hint and keep my preferences as is, rather than force me into their advertising model.

But we've also learned about what is called Facebook's Edgerank algorithm.  Edgerank, for Facebook, determines who and what you interact with and starts to drop updates from your feed, based on how little you interact with pages AND FRIENDS.

Yep, even your friends.

That means if you like A, B and C, and are friends with D, E and F, and you tend to comment on A posts and D's updates, over time Facebook wills start trimming B, C, E and F's updates from your feed.

Then, altogether, you'll stop seeing them on Facebook.

So the other day I did something interesting.

I went into my own profile and started looking through my "likes" on Facebook.

Sure, first I had to slide past their f*ing suggested likes.  But then I saw stuff I've liked and haven't seen in forever!!!  It seems like they're sorted by the latest likes on top, and your oldest likes on the bottom.

You should go check it out.  Sure enough, there are some pages I forgot existed!  And there were some pages that had not posted in over several months, so this turned into a great culling experience too!

And then, do likewise for your friends!  Take a gander at your friends and notice how few appear to update their feeds.  Maybe you should go visit their feed and see if they've been truly quiet or you've been filtered.

Of course, don't forget that some of your friends, you may have actively filtered out too, so take that into account before getting too crazy.
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Saturday, February 1, 2014

Netflix and Amazon Prime Suggest They're Rising Prices

The other day I came across a piece about how Netflix is looking to raise prices, but for them, it's a tricky proposition, as they look to address the issue of their product being shared amongst friends and or families, without paying for the extra streaming.

They have an uphill battle.  They tried rising their prices before and that act was met with an unusual public backlash.  That backlash being thousands of customers signing off from their accounts.  This had Netflix rethink their idea.

But this time around, they are talking about setting up different plans... the sole account, the family plan, and what not.  Each one has its own set of restrictions or ability to stream to various or multiple sessions.

Though there are still aspects of the service that customers would love to see change.  Much like the ability to modify their viewing history and the like.

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Amazon has put out the news that they too are thinking of raising their price for Amazon Prime.

For the uninitiated, Amazon Prime, for an annual fee, provides "free" 2-day shipping on everything you order from Amazon, for those distributors that participate in the program.  (Let me tell you, this 2-day delivery is AWESOME!)

It also allows you unfettered FREE access to a huge collection of movies and TV series.  And there's a whole bunch of extras on top of that, including a digital library of Kindle books.

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Before you go off the rails on this price increase announcement let's think about this...  Amazon Prime has cost $79 per year for the last NINE years.  And as Amazon points out, shipping costs have gone up since the inception of Amazon Prime.

So I can accept this premise.  And as far as I'm concerned, I order enough product from Amazon to have it pay for itself several times over.  And this does not count the free entertainment they offer via the service.

Right now, there's no set schedule for when the price increase will take place, or if existing members will be grandfathered into the increase.

Regardless, if you order from Amazon more than a few times a year, or like watching movies and TV shows for free... well, this is almost the neatest thing since sliced bread.

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